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School of Molecular & Biomedical Science
The University of Adelaide
AUSTRALIA 5005

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Dr David Ellis
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Aspergillus flavus

On Czapek dox agar, colonies are granular, flat, often with radial grooves, yellow at first but quickly becoming bright to dark yellow-green with age. Conidial heads are typically radiate, mostly 300-400 um in diameter, later splitting to form loose columns, biseriate but having some heads with phialides borne directly on the vesicle. Conidiophores are hyaline and coarsely roughened, the roughness often being more noticeable near the vesicle. Conidia are globose to subglobose (3-6 um in diameter), pale green and conspicuously echinulate. Some strains produce brownish sclerotia.  RG-2 organism.

Culture of Aspergillus flavus
Culture of Aspergillus flavus.

Conidial head of A. flavus
Conidial head of A. flavus.
Note: conidial heads with both uniseriate and biseriate
arrangement of phialides may be present.

 

MIC data is limited.  Antifungal susceptibility testing of individual strains is recommended.

Antifungal MIC ug/mL Antifungal
MIC ug/mL
Range
MIC90
Range
MIC90
Itraconazole
0.03-8
0.5
Amphotericin B
0.03->8
4
Voriconazole
0.03-2
0.5
Anidulafungin
0.03-0.125
nd
Posaconazole
0.03-1
0.5
Caspofungin
0.03->8
nd

 

Clinical significance:

Aspergillus flavus has a world-wide distribution and normally occurs as a saprophyte in soil and on many kinds of decaying organic matter. A. flavus is the second most common species (next to A. fumigatus) to be isolated from human infections, and it is often associated with invasive aspergillosis seen in immunosuppressed patients and in paranasal sinus infections.

Mycosis: Aspergillosis

Further reading:

De Hoog G.S. and J Guarro. 1995. Atlas of clinical fungi. Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures, Baarn and Delft, The Netherlands.

Kwon-Chung, K.J. and J.E. Bennett. 1992. Medical Mycology. Lea & Febiger, Philadelphia and London.