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Mould Identification: A Virtual Self Assessment

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Unknown 46 = Fusarium oxysporum.

Case History
A 40-year-old male presented with 65% burn injuries to his lower legs. He underwent several operative procedures for debridement, excision, and skin grafting. Despite bilateral below knee amputations he died 55 days after injury. The culture shown below was isolated.
Culture
Culture

Colonies growing rapidly, 4.5 cm in 4 days, aerial mycelium white, becoming purple, with discrete orange sporodochia present in some strains; reverse hyaline to dark blue or dark purple.
Microscopy
Microscopy

Microscopy

Microscopy

Conidiophores are short, single, lateral monophialides in the aerial mycelium, later arranged in densely branched clusters. Macroconidia are fusiform, slightly curved, pointed at the tip, mostly three septate, basal cells pedicellate, 23-54 x 3-4.5 µm. Microconidia are abundant, never in chains, mostly non-septate, ellipsoidal to cylindrical, straight or often curved, 5-12 x 2.3 - 3.5 µm. Chlamydospores are terminal or intercalary, hyaline, smooth or rough-walled, 5-13 µm.   In contrast to F. solani the phialides are short and mostly non-septate. RG-2 organism.
Comment: Most Fusarium species are soil fungi and have a worldwide distribution. Some are plant pathogens, causing root and stem rot, vascular wilt or fruit rot. Several species have emerged as important opportunistic pathogens in humans causing hyalohyphomycosis (especially in burn victims and bone marrow transplant patients), mycotic keratitis and onychomycosis. Other species cause storage rot and are important mycotoxin producers.

About Fusarium Back to Virtual Assessment

What is your identification?

Fusarium oxysporum

Fusarium solani
Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti

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School of Biological Sciences
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THE UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE
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Dr David Ellis
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